Forêt - 60x60

Forêt – 60×60


During his exhibition at Château Bouffémont, Eric Bourse displays the creme de la creme  of his work. Nearly 50 paintings, telling their own story, make up a collection full of emotions, in which one can see the events that shaped the painter’s life.


About Eric Bourse 



1956 –  Eric Bourse is born in Saint-Amand-les-Eaux, a town in the North of France

1981 –  He discovers painting. This is the beginning of a deep, lifelong passion

1983 –  First exhibition, as part of a group of independent artists from his home town

1988 –  First exhibition in a gallery, in Valenciennes

1991/1995 –  Beginning of an initiatory trip through China, South America, Africa and the United-States

1996 –  First personal exhibition at Château d’Olhain, in France

1998 –  Eric Bourse receives first prize at Salon de Lutèce in Paris

1999 – One year later, he receives first prize in the Art Masters contest in New York

2000 – The artist meets Kit Bentley ; this marks the beginning of a beautiful partnership

2001-  After winning the gold medal at the Salon International de Nancy, Eric Bourse exhibits for the first time in England, at the Summers Art Gallery. A series of personal exhibitions worldwide follows.


In 2014, Eric Bourse’s artwork takes up residence at Château Bouffémont. This is the most prolific exhibition the French artist has held to date.

 About Live in Art 

Live in Art logo

Live in Art is first and foremost the story of a woman, Kit Bentley. Born in London but a Parisian at heart, Kit Bentley is passionate. And in love. In love with art, painting, France, Dordogne. In love with talent.

Following her successful studies in Art History and Design, Kit Bentley sets a goal for herself: to make contemporary art accessible to everyone, in part through diversification of exhibition places. Art without borders. In 2001, Kit Bentley opens her own gallery, Summers Art, in West Clandon (Surrey). It later gives birth to a digital version, Live in Art.

Many exhibitions take place there, all of which focus on French contemporary art.

Kit Bentley likes the juxtaposition of modern and ancient, the harmonious showdown between historical and contemporary. In keeping with this approach, isn’t exhibiting Eric Bourse’s work in a place full of history a perfectly logical move?